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Child Symptom Inventories

by Kenneth D. Gadow, PhD and Joyce Sprafkin, PhD

Sorry - this product is no longer available

Child Symptom Inventories

by Kenneth D. Gadow, PhD and Joyce Sprafkin, PhD
Benefits These four inventories provide an easy, efficient way to gather DSM-IV diagnostic information from teachers and parents
Ages 5 to 12 years for CSI-4; 3 to 5 years for ECI-4; 12 to 18 years for ASI-4; 3 to 18 years for ADHD-SC4
Admin time 10 minutes
Scores Criterion-related Screening Cutoff scores plus norm-based Symptom Severity scores. In addition, two Impairment Questions at the end of each scale indicate degree to which symptoms impair academic and/or social functioning
Publish Date 1997
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About This Product

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BY KENNETH D. GADOW, PHD, AND JOYCE SPRAFKIN, PHD

Child Symptom Inventory–4 (CSI-4) (2002)

Based on DSM-IV diagnostic criteria, the CSI-4 screens for symptoms of common childhood psychiatric disorders. It gives schools a cost-effective way to convey relevant referral information, and it gives clinicians input from parents and teachers—which helps them focus interviews, detect comorbid conditions, and make differential diagnoses.

The inventory lists symptoms of emotional and behavioral disorders specified in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA):

  • ADHD
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder
  • Conduct Disorder
  • Separation Anxiety
  • Generalized Anxiety
  • Social Phobia
  • Specific Phobia
  • Depression
  • Dysthymia
  • Asperger’s Syndrome
  • Pervasive Developmental Disorder
  • Schizophrenia
  • Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
  • Motor Tic Disorder
  • Vocal Tic Disorder 

The CSI-4 provides the basis for a DSM-IV diagnosis—which is often required for referral and reimbursement.

Early Childhood Inventory–4 (ECI-4) (1997)

The ECI-4 screens younger children for virtually the same disorders addressed by the Child Symptom Inventory–4. However, it drops Schizophrenia and adds Reactive Attachment Disorder, Selective Mutism, and eating, sleeping, and elimination problems. Also, a brief developmental section gives a global impression of the child’s speech/language abilities, motor coordination, and social skills.

Adolescent Symptom Inventory–4 (ASI-4) (2008)

This checklist screens adolescents for nearly the same disorders addressed by the Child Symptom Inventory–4. While it drops Asperger’s Syndrome, PDD, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, the ASI-4 adds seven problems that are more common in adolescents: 

  • Dysthymia
  • Schizoid Personality
  • Panic Attack
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Anorexia
  • Bulimia
  • Drug Use

Like the other DSM-IV checklists, the ASI-4 can be used to determine the need for further testing or to inform diagnostic interviews.

Adolescent Symptom Inventory–4 (ASI-4) (2008)

This checklist screens adolescents for nearly the same disorders addressed by the Child Symptom Inventory–4. While it drops Asperger’s Syndrome, PDD, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, the ASI-4 adds seven problems that are more common in adolescents: 

  • Dysthymia
  • Schizoid Personality
  • Panic Attack
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Anorexia
  • Bulimia
  • Drug Use

Like the other DSM-IV checklists, the ASI-4 can be used to determine the need for further testing or to inform diagnostic interviews.

ADHD Symptom Checklist–4 (ADHD-SC4) (2008)

This 50-item checklist measures symptoms of ADHD. It includes a Peer Conflict Scale, which assesses aggression, and a Stimulant Side Effects Checklist to monitor medication. While the Peer Conflict Scale shows high agreement with direct observations of aggression, the checklist as a whole corresponds with actual psychiatric diagnoses, differentiates clinical and nonclinical groups, and reflects response to treatment.

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