(SLDT-E: NU) Social Language Development Test–Elementary: Normative Update

by Linda Bowers, Rosemary Huisingh and Carolyn M. LoGiudice

(SLDT-E: NU) Social Language Development Test–Elementary: Normative Update

by Linda Bowers, Rosemary Huisingh and Carolyn M. LoGiudice
Benefits Measures language-based skills of social interpretation and interaction with friends to differentiate typically developing children from those diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.
Ages 6 years to 11 years, 11 months
Admin time 45 Minutes
Scores Updated norms based on the 2015 U.S. Census. New standard score metric for subtests and composites (M=10, SD=3; M=100, SD=15. All-new item analysis and item bias studies providing convincing evidence of content-description validity. All-new reliability and validity studies, including diagnostic accuracy analyses (considered the most rigorous techniques for establishing validity.
Publish Date 2016
Qualifications Level C required.
About Qualification Levels
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About This Product

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The SLDT-E: NU assesses language-based skills of social interpretation and interaction with friends, the skills found to be most predictive of social language development. Specifically, it measures the language required to appropriately infer and express what another person is thinking or feeling within a social context, to make multiple interpretations, take mutual perspectives, and negotiate with and support their peers. These tasks reflect the developmental refinement of social language comprehension and expression and differentiate typically developing children from those with autism spectrum disorder.

The SLDT-E: NU has four subtests, which require students to make inferences, interpret photographed scenes, and explain how they would resolve problems with peers. The Examiner’s Manual includes a comprehensive discussion of the test’s theoretical and research-based foundation, item development, standardization, administration and scoring procedures, norms tables, and guidelines for using and interpreting the test’s results. Reliability and validity studies were conductedwith individuals with typically developing language abilities and individuals who had previously been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

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